Archive for the ‘working out’ Category

For Golf, Working Out Is Paramount

Though I’m sure other fitness trainers — even regular sessions at the local gym — could be effective, I like how the program focuses on becoming fit for golf. As TheraGolf founder Skip Latella tells me, “If you do even 10 minutes a day of flexibility exercises and other aerobic conditioning and some strength training, you can retard the natural aging process. But there’s a difference between being strong and having certain flexi-bility and being specifically fit for golf.”

TheraGolf, Latella says, develops strength, balance and flexibility through a complete range of motion for golf.

Sign me up, I say.

MAY

A month into my workout regimen I make a startling discovery: My car has a backseat! Before, whenever I shifted into reverse, I could swivel my head just enough to glimpse the rear window. Backing out of the parking

No Sweat Flexibility??

The results of the Microfiber Reduction technique developed by Bob Prichard of Somax Posture & Sports seem too good to believe. David Leadbetter was so impressed he had his son, Andy, a 14-year-old golf whiz, undergo treatments. “Afterward we asked Andy — who’s normally pretty stiff for a kid — to check the range of motion in his hamstrings by raising his knee to his chest,” Leadbetter tells me. “Well, Andy almost knocked himself out when his kneecap hit his chin. He was that loose.”

Microfiber Reduction, Prichard explains, is a kind of massage that releases scar tissue that forms in the fascia, or connective tissue, between muscles (see illustration). Every muscle is surrounded by this thin membrane — “much like sausage is wrapped in its casing,” is how Prichard puts it. Through injuries, overuse or stress, the connective tissue

Kickbox Attack!

Biochemically, lactic acid build-up will cause fatigue in the muscles, and unless a proper rest period for its removal is provided, the participant will fatigue prematurely. Without such a proper rest period, the acid cannot be used as an oxidative fuel and may result in either a less-than-optimal workout (in the best-case scenario) or a potential cardiovascular or musculoskeletal incident (in the worst-case scenario). Such fatigue can lead to a breakdown in form and, therefore, potential musculoskeletal damage due to hyperextensions or the lack of ability of the antagonist muscles to decelerate the movement and thereby prevent mechanical injury.

kbExercise in general is disruptive to skeletal muscle and, therefore, must be limited in intensity. The nature of the movement should also be regulated. For example, an alternating punch combination can be thrown for a longer work period than a single